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Drinking Water Week 2017

Hundreds of Charlotte Water employees are part of that journey, and during National Drinking Water Week, May 7-13, we celebrate and recognize the vital role water plays in our community.

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2017 Model Water Tower Competition

Charlotte Water is hosting the 3rd Annual NC AWWA-WEA Model Water Tower Competition. Register today!

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Inflow and Infiltration and Why it Matters.

We asked Water Quality Program Administrator Shannon Sypolt to tell us a little about I&I. Read more

Fire Hydrant Decal Change

Hydrants are part of the water distribution system and an essential part of public safety, public health, and customer service to our community.

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Why don’t the water mains underground freeze?

Did the recent cold temperatures have you wondering why the water mains in the ground didn’t freeze? Well, you are in luck. We asked Gabe Sasser our Water Quality Specialist and Clemson Alum (Go Tigers!) that exact question, and here is what he said: Read more

Lancaster Hwy Pipe Repair Updates

Update: Crews successfully replaced the leaking drinking water valve and kept customers in service throughout the difficult repair. The northbound lane reopened Sunday afternoon. The southbound lane reopened Wednesday (December 21st) evening. Additional work will be needed to rebuild road at a later time. CLTWater will update when lanes close/reopen. Read more

Five New Ways to Conserve Water at Home

Since 2001, water consumption for an average family of four in Mecklenburg County has gone down from 11 Ccfs (8,228 gallons) per 30-day billing cycle to 7 Ccf’s (5,236 gallons) per 30-day billing cycle. We attribute this to increased water conservation measures as well as the installation of more efficient appliances and irrigation systems. Read more

Getting the Lead Out

In April 2014 the drinking water industry was forever changed when the City of Flint switched the source of their municipal water supply from Detroit Water to the Flint River. That seemingly innocuous change caused lead to dissolve into the drinking water of tens of thousands of Flint residents when managers failed to provide corrosion control measures. The effects of the Flint Water Crisis continue to ripple through cities and towns across America as citizens wonder if the drinking water in their community is safe to use. Read more