How Charlotte Water Staff Prioritize Leaks

You walk out your door and see a line of water trickling down the street. (great you think, another leak in Charlotte). So you call 311 or send us a tweet to report the leak. Charlotte Water staff thank you for reporting it and say they will repair it. A few days pass by and the... Continue Reading →

Featured post

Annual Wastewater Report Released

Did you know that there is an annual report for wastewater? If you answered "no" then here is all you need to know about the people who make sure your flush doesn’t become a mess. When you flush, shower, or wash dishes, the wastewater flows from your plumbing to our public wastewater network of pipes.... Continue Reading →

Flushing and the growth of the Queen City

Before cranes build the next skyscraper or apartment complex, developers must reach out to Charlotte Water to see if the wastewater infrastructure has the capacity for the increase in the-ahem-flow. From the pipes that carry your wastewater to the treatment plants, to the plants themselves, they all have a specific amount of wastewater that they... Continue Reading →

1600 W. Morehead St. Water Main Break

At approximately 4:30 p.m. Sunday, June 23 a water main break near the intersection of W. Morehead St. and Freedom Dr. was reported to 911. Charlotte Fire Department and Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department responded and quickly alerted Charlotte Water to the situation. Pavement upheaval, areas of low pressure and temporary localized flooding were caused by the... Continue Reading →

What are disinfection byproducts?

Disinfection byproducts (DBP) are formed in our distribution system when chlorine used to disinfect drinking water reacts with naturally occurring organic matter in your water. There are many types of DBP including TTHM (trihalomethane), HAA5 (haloacetic acid), bromate and chlorite.  In all there are 9 types of DBP and 5 are regulated by the North... Continue Reading →

Turbidity

Turbidity is a key water quality measurement taken at our treatment plants, fire hydrants and sampling stations throughout the 4,300 miles of drinking water pipes. Turbidity is the measure of the cloudiness of the water. Generally, it comes from soil runoff. We monitor it because it is a good indicator of the effectiveness of the filtration system. If turbidity... Continue Reading →

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

Up ↑